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Bardon Hall Mews – A Brief History

22nd May 2019

BARDON HALL MEWS – AN EXTRACT FROM DAVID HALL’S BOOK, FAR HEADINGLEY, WEETWOOD & WEST PARK (Published in 2000 by the Far Headingley Village Society)

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“The most potent memorial of Joseph Pickersgill, inevitably remains the stable building at Bardon Hill which he built, sparing no expense, making Far Headingley- unlikely though this may seem -home to one of the most opulent structures of its kind in the Country. A fine stone building with lavish interior wall tiling, cast iron stall dividers and stained glass windows. It was later converted into a large Assembly-Dining Room for the school and it now stands derelict awaiting another conversion, this time into a series of mews houses. But in 1920 the auctioneers were in no doubt about its reputation and wrote that Joseph Pickersgill’s STABLES:

‘believed to be second to none in the Kingdom, were erected at enormous cost and are now in splendid order grouped on three sides of a paved yard. The buildings are of stone in the half timbered style, with high pitched roofs covered with red tiles, and surmounted by a tower cased in copper and containing a clock which chimes the quarters on four bells, strikes the hours, and has four illuminated dials, and which forms such a well known feature of the district. The major portion of the exposed woodwork is of teak put together exclusively by wooden pins or screws. Central heating is installed and the lighting is by electricity.

The STABLES have tiled walls throughout and a fireproof ceiling, and are divided into five stalls and four loose boxes, the fittings being electroplated; the windows, which have leaded lights, are of teak and so are the doors; over all is a corn chamber, battery store, and workshop with concrete floor, and two cranes are fixed. The SADDLE ROOM has a panelled teak ceiling, teak harness cupboards on two sides with plate-glass doors, bit cupboard with three glass doors, stone fireplace and grate and concrete floor. The CARRIAGE HOUSE is lofty and open to the roof. A narrow glass and ornamental iron verandah runs on two sides of the yard, and in the centre is a broad covered space to correspond, the yard being enclosed by stone walling with iron railings and a pair of teak gates attached to imposing dress stone pillars.’

                           Extract from the 1920 sales particulars. Courtesy: Leeds Diocesan Archives.

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